Listen to part three of “The Secret of the Yamas”

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  1. Violence is something that we all contain, but we all can control it. For some the violence within themselves spreads due to damage or pain they have experienced. We have the chance to chose our path and how we want to treat others. The influence of the Yama and Niyama practices can aid us and lead us to a path of non violence and peace in this chaotic world we live in. It can help us clear our minds to come to a peaceful state and by doing this one can become a happier individual. This audio clip also made me think a lot about how I can only lead myself to who I, supposed to be, I am the only one in charge of my actions and how I treat people. I want to be the best version of myself I can possibly be and I can project this by being kind and expressing all the characteristics mentioned in the previous assignment. Mindfulness is something that can help everyone with controlling our anger and sadness, we can start changing our behavior

  2. I find it interesting in hearing about other folks culture and how they handle certain things. I makes me sad to hurt that “violence is apart of our human nature”. No one is born violence, just like no one is born a racist; however is interesting to see the way people grow up change their mindsets. I also find it interesting how society groups us in these two categories. I like how they said the only way for true change is to go deep in our violence incidents and understand what we did wrong and then, then are we able to actually help ourselves or another individual. In addition, another good thing I heard is that no one can bring you to yourself; no one can help you develop and find who you are. Its only up to ourselves to be willing to change.

    • If you had taken each sentence and made it into an idea to write about moreso you could have created a satisfactory essay. Have you considered seeking help in the writing Center?

  3. “The infinite flower of life is a constant assault on the barriers we’ve constructed and individual violence is a result.” Violence is perceived as a physical action caused by uncontrolled anger or desperation to protect oneself. What most people do not realize is that violence comes in subtle forms and is caused by our own natures. We as people are inherently violent, which is why we strive for nonviolence. However, we are limited because we cannot see the actual root of our violence and therefore are ineffective in preventing it. First, we must alter our definition of violence. Violence is not only physical or verbal assault, but it is any action in which we try to impose our will or belief upon others. Violence is when we try to prevent others from infringing on our ideals or principals. It is when we attempt to persuade someone to do something we like or try to prevent someone from a course of actions because we believe it is wrong. With this definition, it is clear that we are violent everyday. The question is, what can we do? There is no set formula or instructions for eliminating violence. The root of violence is unique for each person. Yet, we seek assurance, and we trick ourselves. We desire to get rid of violence without searching within. When we do this, we act violent towards ourselves and we only address surface effects, not true causes. Consequently, we receive only surface results and we actually strengthen our anger. The first thing we must do to truly minimize violence is to get rid of distractions. As the first part of this series mentioned, we do not want to look within ourselves because it is terrifying. When we look within ourselves, we realize the full extent of our violence and we are ashamed. Yet, looking within ourselves is immensely beneficial. When we focus on self discovery, we can find the internal causes of violence, its impacts, the conditions that give it energy and power, its root, and the mechanism which sustains it. Then, we can change things within ourselves to truly alter our actions and thoughts. This will make us and the people around us much happier.

    I believe that part of our anger stems from mass media and societal standards. Society has taught us that organization and security are ideals which we should strive for. So, we make plans because we believe that our lives will fall apart otherwise. Strict scheduling leads to impatience, which is a widespread form of violence in the world. Society has also conditioned us to be intolerant and aggressive. We believe there is only one correct opinion or idea, and we become defensive when someone challenges these. In my yoga practices, I hope to find the root of violence. I want to look within myself so I can be happier and help the people around me be happier. I believe that if we all focused on the root of violence and became more tolerant, the world could be a much happier, peaceful, and cooperative place.

    SEPTEMBER 27 2017
    When I first learned about the finger holds technique, I was curious. How could such complicated emotions such as fear, anger, sadness, worry, and self esteem be solved while only using your hands? However, as I began to think, I realized that our hands are a large part of calming nerves and overwhelming emotions. When people are nervous, they automatically fiddle with their hands. When they are anxious, people look at their hands. When people need comfort, they hold hands. This response indicates that our hands play a large part in dealing with emotions and stress. If we learn how to utilize our hands, we can become much calmer. The first time we practiced in class, I felt enlightened and I felt like I gained a lot from the experience. Yoga is on Wednesday, after all my art classes. I often feel stressed thinking about all the painting I have to do later in the day. That day, I was anxious thinking about the large painting I had yet to complete. During the finger hold exercise, I focused on my thumb and pinky and I really felt a difference. I felt more relaxed, confident that I would be able to manage my time and get my paintings done. I also felt like I would do a good job. I think focusing for a moment and feeling my pulse allowed me to calm down. Once I calmed my emotions, I realized that I could stop worrying and start doing. I was making my worries much larger than they actually were.

    Ever since we practiced the finger hold exercise, it has become part of my day. It is easy because it only takes a few minutes and does not require equipment. I take a moment every now and then when I am painting to practice. This allows me to focus more, and the feeling of relaxation and confidence I experience definitely affects my art for the better. Since I have benefitted from the practice, I decided to teach my sister. She is in high school and college is approaching. Naturally, life can be stressful. So, I showed her the finger hold exercise so she could calm her stress when needed. She says it has been effective and she finds it amazing how such a small and quick practice can make such a huge difference. As yoga continues to become more of habit than an assignment for me, I will be sure to keep this practice in my routine.

  4. “The infinite flower of life is a constant assault on the barriers we’ve constructed and individual violence is a result.” Violence is perceived as a physical action caused by uncontrolled anger or desperation to protect oneself. What most people do not realize is that violence comes in subtle forms and is caused by our own natures. We as people are inherently violent, which is why we strive for nonviolence. However, we are limited because we cannot see the actual root of our violence and therefore are ineffective in preventing it. First, we must alter our definition of violence. Violence is not only physical or verbal assault, but it is any action in which we try to impose our will or belief upon others. Violence is when we try to prevent others from infringing on our ideals or principals. It is when we attempt to persuade someone to do something we like or try to prevent someone from a course of actions because we believe it is wrong. With this definition, it is clear that we are violent everyday. The question is, what can we do? There is no set formula or instructions for eliminating violence. The root of violence is unique for each person. Yet, we seek assurance, and we trick ourselves. We desire to get rid of violence without searching within. When we do this, we act violent towards ourselves and we only address surface effects, not true causes. Consequently, we receive only surface results and we actually strengthen our anger. The first thing we must do to truly minimize violence is to get rid of distractions. As the first part of this series mentioned, we do not want to look within ourselves because it is terrifying. When we look within ourselves, we realize the full extent of our violence and we are ashamed. Yet, looking within ourselves is immensely beneficial. When we focus on self discovery, we can find the internal causes of violence, its impacts, the conditions that give it energy and power, its root, and the mechanism which sustains it. Then, we can change things within ourselves to truly alter our actions and thoughts. This will make us and the people around us much happier.

    I believe that part of our anger stems from mass media and societal standards. Society has taught us that organization and security are ideals which we should strive for. So, we make plans because we believe that our lives will fall apart otherwise. Strict scheduling leads to impatience, which is a widespread form of violence in the world. Society has also conditioned us to be intolerant and aggressive. We believe there is only one correct opinion or idea, and we become defensive when someone challenges these. In my yoga practices, I hope to find the root of violence. I want to look within myself so I can be happier and help the people around me be happier. I believe that if we all focused on the root of violence and became more tolerant, the world could be a much happier, peaceful, and cooperative place.

  5. As a person that for many years has struggled with both self and outer aggression for many years this is an insightful message. Hostility is something very present in members of my family , not in any physical form but verbally, and once I understood that words can just as (if not more) violent that any physical action I became infinitely conscious of this in myself and also my response to it. Ever since then I am constantly looking for violence in my words and actions as I decided I wanted to end the cycle of verbal violence with those I care about. At first I realized how difficult it was as it was so interwoven in my interactions and reactions , I was so unconscious of it I did not even fathom that violence is complex and can take many forms. I’ve revisited many instances where my main objective was to try and sway someone my way without understanding just how intrusive and aggressive that actions is. I can say though that I have come a long way from where I started, and it has changed me into a more compassionate individual both towards myself and others. I realized the root of my own violence stems from a number of things that I am now actively working on while also learning as much as I can about nonviolent communication. Even if it is something I keep on my mind most times it is good to address it directly once again every once in a while as the source of ones own violence shifts as you grow and change. Thank you for the reminder to keep actively working on being a more open, understanding, and compassionate person.

  6. As a child I struggled with the understanding of violence, and trying to control what I would do with my anger and frustration. As I aged, and began to understand that it was not going anywhere. I did in-fact have to accept that it was apart of my being. This was something that I did not have a hard time figuring out, however I did have a hard time coping with other peoples “Violence.” This is what frustrated me the most. that other people would be so openly violent, and when ever I would have a momentary outburst I would be immediately punished. How come other people could express this emotion free of charge and I was always held accountable for my very human emotions. but then I slowly began to realize that these people that were so openly violent really had no control or refused to acknowledge that they were being violent. For some of my friends, I became a sort of calming force. some have even asked me how I remain so calm. I would tell them “I’m not calm, the situation just doesn’t require more hostility.” So it is nice to hear that the world and I aren’t so different.

  7. In the world we live in now, it is right or wrong, who’s liked or dislike; very black and white. It’s like there can’t be no in between. Like the reading says, we like to see people who wrong us get wronged as well because we think they deserve it. We long or karma to get the people who wrong us. But what happens if karma doesn’t get to them? How are you going to feel then?

    This is where violence comes in. The more we want to see purple hurt, the more separate we are from love. We have to find the root of where this violence is coming from and why. Only then is when we could understand and find a solution to release that violence. This isn’t something that resides in the surface and if you just try to scrape the surface off, it is just going to keep coming back. Releasing this violence also releases your demons and allow you to grow beautifully with love.

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